Kawazuzakura

 

Kawazu Collage

Dear Sharon,

Greetings from Kawazu Cherry Blossom Festival 2014! In your comment, you asked me to show you more of this part of the trip, so here’s a picture of a very old tree outside a shrine. The sign tells you about the tree – hope you can read it!

Anyway you can also see the shrine and some small farms which grow carnations and other stuff and you can visit the carnation farm during the day if you want or you can walk along the river and soak your feet in the foot onsens instead. Or play with river rocks.

That’s it for now, hope everyone’s well, and don’t forget the fridge door tends to swing outwards unless you close it really properly, A’s worried you’ll forget that. Miss you!

Love,
Everyone

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Kawazu Cherry Blossom Festival Food Collage

Dear Sharon,

Straight after I popped that last one in the post I saw this one, and I thought hey yeah, you’d probably like to know what we’ve been eating. So would we! Hah hah. No seriously, if you can tell us what that dark green stuff is that’d be great. Don’t tell P his “lollipop” is a sausage, though, it’d spoil the magic.

Probably our favourite so far is the weird copper apparatus thing you can see in the top left on the front of this postcard. They’re pressure-cooking chestnuts. I thought they were tasty, but P was mainly into them for the steampunk vibe. We also ate pork(?) buns, sweet potato wedges, fresh and candied fruit (we would have had chocolate-dipped bananas with hundreds and thousands but I managed to find something interesting to point at in the other direction every time we saw a stall with them), salted fish and I can’t remember what else. I guess they have to drink beer, too, for the scarecrows. The drawbacks of farming!

Oh and there was this weird cherry blossom gel paste stuff which we bought heaps of and it was good because P gave it away to some people in a waiting room and then they kept us a seat on the train later. It’s sweet but only a little bit.

Love,
Everyone.

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Kawazu Cherry Blossom Festival 2014 Collage

Dear Sharon,

It pains me
To realise I for-
-got these things.

Love,
Everyone

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Extra and Related:

The Kawazu Cherry Blossom Festival is held annually from mid-February to mid-March, and is one of the earliest opportunities to view cherry blossoms in Honshu.

The festival was generally stroller-friendly. There were also plenty of porta-loos, but we didn’t see any baby change areas, so you might have to work with what you’ve got (stroller/change mat on ground/etc).

There’s no problem whatsoever with navigation. Just follow the cherry trees! If you want more direction, festival maps are available at the train station or online via the official Kawazu Onsen visitor’s website (although note that the waterfalls are a lot further by bus than it looks at first glance). If you want less direction, feel free to wander at random – it’s a nice, small village.

Although the main market area was crowded, it was easy to escape to the quiet of the shrine and other parts of the village and surrounds.

Trees are lit after dark, which we were totally going to hang around for until we got tired and damp and cold. You can view day and night pictures at the official Kawazu Onsen visitor’s website.

Cherry blossom season is now in full swing across Honshu. Check the forecast here and view local blossom varieties online at, for example, Japan Australia (Gifu) or Shizuoka Pictures (Shizuoka City).

Learn how we ended up at the Kawazu Cherry Blossom Festival as part of our family holiday around Japan. We stayed in nearby Rendaiji, just two stops by train away from Kawazu.

This post appeared first at Journeys of the Fabulist and was shared as part of Friday Postcards at Walking On Travels.

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