Trifectas and Getai

This is the part of blogging I suck at. (Shh, I didn’t ask for your view anyway.) (Although my goodness, you are totally right and maybe I should rethink not just my web presence but my life. To do! Urgent!.)

Anyway, Tvor Travels has kindly nominated me for a three-in-one award package and I have to find a way to respond to it which is more appropriate to this medium than fanning myself and hugging people and trying to flick tears out of my eyes without smudging my mascara.

See? Not coming across.

See? Not coming across.

Thank you, Tvor – I am honoured. I do enjoy Tvor’s photos, like, for example, some of the black and white textures you see here, or the Great Glass Testicle featured in this series. I’m not really sure how to even go about picking ten bloggers, though. I’ve been having all kinds of social anxiety about it and I think I’m more comfortable name-dropping as I read and post. I mean, which of the great bloggers I know are even into these things? It’s a minefield.

Luckily, the grassy space beside 261 Bishan Street 22 is not a minefield, or we wouldn’t have had the pleasure of a relaxed evening checking out the Getai scene there earlier this week. Song Stages are transient things, so keeping up with them required the use of the Getai 2013 Schedule for Singapore on Facebook, which gives twenty-four hours’ advance warning of where you need to be, when. For those of you wondering how the tradition sustained itself over the centuries before digital social media, recall that Simple Mum also pointed out you can use the evening tabloid to keep yourself in the loop. I’ve no idea how people got on before the printing press. (In a lot of ways, it seems to me they didn’t.)

Rocking the Song Stage.

Rocking the Song Stage.

Burning in the Singaporean heartlands.

Burning in the Singapore heartlands.

And over the road for tea.

And over the road for tea.

If you have a thriving Chinese community near you and no unbreakable plans for the weekend, I’ll just throw this thought out: there are still several days left before the end of the Hungry Ghost Festival, and Getai enthusiasts use social media to advertise events now. You could totally make it happen. And if there’s nothing within coo-ee but you still want your fix of sequins, singing and supernatural, I recommend a movie night in watching 881.

Next up on the Chinese festival calendar: moon cakes and pyromania.

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